snousle: (castrocauda)
From Nature, Mar. 11, "An Avian Sexual Revolution":

Male and female vertebrates have long been thought to owe their distinct sexual characteristics — their sexual phenotypes — to the action of hormones produced by the gonads...

Gynandromorphs are naturally occuring organisms that have both male and female structures... the division between male and female tissues may fall along the midline, producing a bilateral gynandromorph, or occur in a mosaic pattern across the body. The condition can result from sex-chromosome aneuploidy (that is, abberant loss or gain of a sex chromosome) or from abnormal fertilization events.


Translation: Gender is not just about hormones. In some cases, organisms can be a chimera of two genetically distinct cell lines of different genders - two siblings fused into one individual - even though they look more or less normal. It's sort of the opposite of identical twins; instead of two bodies sharing one genome, one body shares two genomes. This article goes on to describe chickens that are male on one side of their body, and female on the other.

That's a new one for me, never heard of that before!

Profile

snousle: (Default)
snousle

August 2013

S M T W T F S
    123
4 5 678910
11121314151617
1819202122 2324
25262728293031

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 26th, 2017 12:42 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios